Rise Above the Fear of Falling

Rise Above the Fear of Falling

Even when our bodies are at our strongest, the impact of a fall can be quite severe. For elderly people whose bodies have lost strength and whose balance is less than exemplary, falling is a serious risk and can have massive consequences. Indeed, one-third of elderly people will suffer at least one fall every year, but amazingly, fewer than half of these will notify their doctor. Also, an elderly adult who suffers a fall is twice as likely to fall again. Rise Above the Fear of Falling
 
Rise Above the Fear of Falling
Irish company Home Healthcare Adaptations created this infographic which outlines common causes of falls in elderly people, as well as the lasting effects that can occur. When an elderly person falls, it’s very unlikely that they’ll simply say ‘Ouch’ and pick themselves up again with ease. It is far more probable that they will suffer broken bones or reduced mobility – and that’s if they’re fortunate. In some cases, it can result in a serious head injury or even prove to be fatal.
An elderly person might understandably be nervous about falling, but the best way to overcome this fear is to meet it head-on and try out a simple chair rise exercise, as described in the infographic below. This will help to greatly improve balance and ease the person’s fears. Although it is important to urge elderly people to exercise caution, we shouldn’t scaremonger, as this could plant a giant seed of self-doubt in their mind.
We can also help by following a few simple safety guidelines such as keeping floors clear of trip hazards and pull rugs, plus installing grab rails and bannisters where they may be needed. These straightforward modifications could make all the difference in helping an elderly person to avoid a fall. Rise Above the Fear of Falling

Rise Above the Fear of Falling

About the Author

Kimberly Johnson

As Senior.com Director of Sales and Marketing, Kimberly Johnson is passionate about providing Seniors with the resources and products to live well.  Kimberly is a seasoned caregiver to her family and breast cancer survivor.  Her father battled ALS, Lou Gehrig’s disease and she was a primary caregiver.  Today Kimberly lives in Southern California near her 104-year-old grandmother, widowed mother, a mentally disabled sister and second sister who is also a breast cancer survivor.  She is happily married to her husband of 24 years and they have 3 children.

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