Controlling Confusion in Older Adults

There are many who find themselves getting in family arguments about controlling confusion in older adults. This is because it is common for family members and their caregivers to notice changes in behavior, and cognitive abilities, over time. When these shifts happen unexpectedly, a family caregiver might view the behavior as irrational or paranoid. But, for the senior experiencing the confusion, it is very real. A change in your loved one’s behavior could be due to an undiagnosed cognitive impairment. Sometimes these manifest themselves as fears and worries. Or there may be complaints and confusion. In more extreme cases, shifts

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How Dangerous is Social Media to Seniors’ Well-Being?

How Dangerous is Social Media to Seniors’ Well-Being?

Ten years ago, few people would have predicted that seniors would become some of social media’s most passionate users. But a study last year by Pew Research Center found that 62% of online seniors are on Facebook. Other studies show that social media use among seniors is rising at a rapid rate.  How Dangerous is Social Media to Seniors’ Well-Being? As more and more seniors use social media, there are growing concerns. Most research indicates that social media improves quality of life for elderly adults. But some senior care professionals are increasingly worried about the dangers that social media could pose

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Attitudes to Enhance Aging

What is your mindset about growing older? Do you want to avoid thinking about it for as long as possible? Is it a negative passage to be endured? To set an ideal mid-life into motion, you need a positive outlook. A study of 660 adults aged 50 and older in Ohio, published in the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, found that people who had positive attitudes about aging lived more than seven years longer than those with negative attitudes. While the results remain unproven by other researchers, the study does link positive outlook and good health. For example, depression

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How to Thrive When Aging Alone

How to Thrive When Aging Alone

Have you heard of the term Elder Orphan?  It's a new way of framing categorizing who are aging alone.  I began to think about aging alone after caring for my parents. My mother struggled with heart problems, while my father lived with Alzheimer’s disease. Watching their decline was heartbreaking. It was close to one year after dad’s passing when the question hit me: “Who will care for me?” That was 10 years ago. Today, I’m 65. The U.S. Census Bureau tells us more than 27 percent of people age 65 and over live alone. One reason is because baby boomers

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Tips Help Individuals Adjust Emotionally To A Senior Living Community

Experts Recommend Family Approach. Sometimes it takes a crowd to help a loved one adjust emotionally to a senior living community. The whole family should be involved, stressing familiarity and continuation of hobbies as keys to a smooth transition. Remember that senior community doesn’t mean nursing home; seniors can live full and happy lives in new surroundings. To foster success, the transition should begin before a move, according to experts. “Preplanning for the future is so important.  Talking with your loved one before he or she needs to move is key,” says Christine Hall-Werner, Senior Director of Marketing and Public

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Seniors Need More Loving Sex as they Age

It’s truly amazing to me that the physical intimacy and loving sex we need to stay healthy as we age is in such short supply when it is so readily available to all of us.   I’m referring to touch and sexual intimacy, innate behaviors that are hard-wired into us humans.  These are not just for the lucky few—the young, the healthy, and the beautiful. These are life-sustaining behaviors given to each one of us at birth. It is our birthright to touch and be touched, to love and be loved, and they are just as essential for our survival when we are older as

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How Friends Keeps Us Young at Heart

Staying socially active enriches our lives, and creating intergenerational friends keeps us young at heart and mind. But, how does an older person create a mutually beneficial relationship with someone a decade or so younger without making them feel like they're being groomed to be the absent child? I've always had older and younger friends. I've been lucky that way and now that I'm older, and have no children, I don't worry that a younger friend will ever feel like I treat her or expect her to take the role of my (absent) child, nor would I want to be

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