5 Ways to Start a Gratitude Practice

Senior woman

Practicing gratitude can decrease stress, increase optimism, and improve your well-being. This is because negative thoughts can be very draining. So, changing your outlook and focusing on the positives in your life can help pave your path to healing. If you need help finding thankfulness in your life, reach out for counseling. Talking about your problems, and recognizing the good you already have in your life, can lead to more happiness and fulfillment while reducing stress and depression. Below are a handful of gratitude exercises, pick one or two and incorporate them into your daily routine. Compliment Yourself Recognize something

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Is Alcohol Good or Bad for Your Bones?

Mature lady unpacking paper bags in kitchen

So you enjoy a glass of wine or two with dinner, the occasional cold beer with friends, or a fancy cocktail at social gatherings...  But have you ever wondered how alcohol might affect your bone health?  After all, research shows that once you hit age 40, you lose about 1% of your bone density a year. This is especially concerning for women who are at increased risk of developing osteoporosis — a condition where bones become weak and prone to fracture.  Does this mean you have to give up your glass of wine with dinner? Well, it depends on whether

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What’s the difference between Alzheimer’s and Dementia?

What’s the difference between Alzheimer’s and Dementia?

  [embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViWdRDs207E[/embed] Link to the Youtube video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ViWdRDs207E One of the most commonly asked questions in memory care is the difference between Alzheimer’s disease and dementia. Though they are quite often (and mistakenly) used interchangeably, there are key differences that will help distinguish the two. Since approaches to Alzheimer’s and dementia care can also vary, it’s even more crucial for medical professionals, patients, and families to understand the differences. Dr. Richard London, Medical Director of Silverado Oak Village Community explains how they differ: What’s the difference between Alzheimer’s and Dementia? Dementia is an umbrella term for the group of symptoms in

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Simple Exercises for Sciatica Relief

Simple Exercises for Sciatica Relief

If you do any sort of exercise, you know that stretching offers invaluable help for your aching muscles. Stretching can let the tension release, can help your muscles warm up, and allow your body to cool down, too. Plus, stretching before and after an exercise session can be a good way to work out any kinks that may be bothering you. Simple Exercises for Sciatica Relief  But stretching isn’t just about exercise relief.  Stretching may also be great for other types of pain, including that caused by the sciatic nerve. Sciatica is a term that describes leg pain that travels from

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Is walking bad for my knees?

Is walking bad for my knees?

We had a sweet woman in our clinic last week who asked us this question… Is walking bad for my knees? “Can walking be bad for my knees?” Is walking bad for my knees? She mentioned she’s started to experience knee pain a few years ago when walking down the stairs and thought nothing of it. Can walking be bad for my knees? She thought it was just something that would “wear off” in time. But, when she noticed the pain in her knees every time she went down the stairs, or walked up and down hills with her dog, she thought she

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Easy ways to get moving this year

Easy ways to get moving this year

New year resolutions can drive us nuts, especially the ones dealing with exercise. There's nothing more irritating than setting goals around an activity that you're not interested in doing. Easy ways to get moving this year Believe me, you're not the only person who dreads the annual January - start an exercise program as a New Year resolution. And dealing with the excuses not to follow through is exhausting. If this rings true for you, I have happy news. You can have your cake and eat it too when it comes to being more physically active during the new year. Because

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Guide to Addiction Prevention for Seniors

Guide to Addiction Prevention for Seniors

Alcohol and drug addiction is a growing problem for seniors, and it's extremely dangerous. As we get older, our metabolisms change, and it becomes more difficult to process things. This can lead to higher intoxication levels and health complications. Guide to Addiction Prevention for Seniors One of the biggest challenges with senior addiction is that its symptoms mimic those of many other conditions associated with aging, such as diabetes, dementia, and vertigo. There’s also a commonly-held belief that fuels the fires. Many people believe that addiction is a disease for the young; seniors have long since passed the age for addiction.

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How to Beat Winter Blues and Seasonal Affective Disorder

How to Beat Winter Blues and Seasonal Affective Disorder

Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) is a condition in which individuals experience increased depression during winter months. Sufferers of SAD often experience these depression cycles at the same time each year. The onset of symptoms of SAD is often during fall and progresses throughout the winter months. How to Beat Winter Blues and Seasonal Affective Disorder Symptoms of Seasonal Affective Disorder Common symptoms of SAD: Chronically depressed mood Disinterest in activities that would normally bring pleasure Feelings of Irritability Feelings of guilt or lack of self-worth Lack of energy Sleeping more than normal especially during daytime hours Sugar cravings that result in

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Incontinence dilemma: quality or savings? Both!

Senior woman talking to young care nurse on home visit

The prevalence of incontinence among people aged 65 and over is significant.  Prevalence varies by living arrangement with the highest rates in long-term nursing home residents (75.8%) and hospice patients (62.1%). The situation is slightly better for noninstitutionalized persons (50.9%), short-term nursing home residents (46.1%) and home healthcare patients (45.4%) with the lowest —  but still significant — rate in residential care facilities (39%). In the United States, the overall cost of bladder incontinence among adults was estimated at $19.5 billion in 2000, and by now this cost must be higher. Incontinence costs The cost of incontinence care is considerable

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