Why Jitterbug has the Best Cell or Smart Phones for Seniors

When you compare cell phones for seniors, it’s easy to get lost in the details. The choice will depend on their needs — will they want a more complex smartphone, a basic flip phone, or a middle-of-the-road phone with standard technology? The most easy-to-use cell phones for seniors are basic flip phones. For those with limited dexterity or bigger fingers, big button phones for seniors work well. The most important features in an easy phone for seniors include: A clear, big, bright display Good sound and speakers Long battery life An emergency help button A durable build Best Cell Phone

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How to Notice Signs of Functional Decline in Seniors

How to Notice Signs of Functional Decline in Seniors

After a certain age, some level of decline should be expected year after year. In our forties and fifties, this decline is incremental. It happens slowly, and while it can affect our physical and mental performance, most of us are still able to live our lives comfortably. But in our sixties and beyond, decline begins to speed up. Eventually, seniors reach a point of functional decline. This is the point where elderly care is required for seniors to live comfortably and safely. Unfortunately, it can be hard to spot functional decline. While decline accelerates in seniors, it still happens gradually

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Busy Fingers, Busy Brain: Why Crafting Is Crucial For Seniors

The US Census Bureau has found that Americans currently spend around five to six hours per day on leisure and sports activities, including hobbies such as crafting.  It’s certainly time well spent, particularly for older adults. Learning and practicing a new craft as a senior brings many rewards; not only can the creative process boost mental health and self-esteem, it can also improve fine motor skills and provide an opportunity for socializing and making friends, which has been scientifically proven to benefit those with Alzheimer's.  So what are you waiting for?  With a broad range of activities to choose from, there’s bound to

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Biggest Senior Concerns

Health and financial security is a prime concern to seniors. In a survey sponsored by the National Council on Aging, found that financial security (71% of seniors) comes ahead of staying involved with family and friends (68%) but women are even more vulnerable than men to financial matters. The study names other worrisome factors like health care and prescription drug costs. The other two are being a burden to family and losing independence. Individuals who help a loved one will risk losing their financial security because they quit their job or work part-time to become a caregiver. They forfeit contributing

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How to Help Seniors Organize and Declutter Their Homes

How to Help Seniors Organize and Declutter Their Homes

Organization is a challenge for people of all ages. After decade upon decade of living in their homes, though, seniors often accumulate mass amounts of clutter and sometimes find it nearly impossible to scale back and organize. Three in four seniors want to age in their own homes, according to the American Association of Retired Persons (AARP), but this sometimes becomes impossible when excess clutter becomes a safety issue. Falls are a leading cause of injury-related deaths among Americans who are over the age of 65, and a disorganized home that is filled to the brim with excess stuff can

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Is it Possible to Prepare for the Future?

Most seniors have not saved enough money for retirement much less compiled a carefully thought out plan for the future. In total, more than 40% of households headed by people aged 55 through 70 lack sufficient resources to maintain a living standard in retirement, a Wall Street Journal analysis concluded. That is around 15 million American households. According to an article in the Wall Street Journal, Americans aged 60 through 69 had about $2 trillion in debt in 2017, an 11% increase per capita from 2004, according to New York Federal Reserve data adjusted for inflation. They had $168 billion

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Why Seniors Isolate

Why Seniors Isolate

There's a growing concern that seniors in retirement are not actively involved and it puts them at risk for chronic conditions. Social isolation and loneliness among older adults are linked to depressive symptoms, poor cognitive functioning, disrupted sleep, lack of physical activity, and impaired mental health-all of which have implications for increased mortality. Other risks include a weakened immune system, increased use of emergency services, early admittance to a nursing home, and frequent falls. In 2018, an academic researcher asked 550 seniors in a Facebook group who frequently discuss feeling isolated, "What are your reasons for being socially inactive? Is

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