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#AgingVoices Building Awareness on Local Senior Issues

#AgingVoices building awareness on local senior issues

Recently, I launched a campaign called #AgingVoices. It started from discussions in a Facebook group for folks who age at home alone with little support from family. I started the group a year ago thinking there’s got to be others in my predicament–over 55, without adult children and a spouse or partner. I hit a jackpot because people joined in droves. #AgingVoices building awareness on local senior issues
Every day a new set of concerns and worries become the hot topic/s for the group. And for solo agers, it’s comforting to know there are others like us. So, the group is a comfort for many. Some common worries are affordable housing, transportation, health care costs, work and isolation. Of course there are other worries that individuals share like, “I fear I’ll die alone and no one will notice.” That one is horrific but very real. #AgingVoices building awareness on local senior issues
Overall, we mostly worry about getting around, staying fit and healthy, and paying our bills.
That’s why I launched a campaign to fight for our aging concerns and needs, and I’m calling it #AgingVoices. The plan is to interview city and state officials and even business leaders asking for their ideas, thoughts and action plans for the “near term” on helping older residents live better. Here are the specific questions:  #AgingVoices building awareness on local senior issues
Housing – What are city planners doing to increase easy to find housing for seniors and to make that HOUSING MORE AFFORDABLE?
Transportation – Seniors need to get around. What are they doing to address this?
Financial – What type of jobs does the area have for seniors, what new ideas/opportunities do older adults have to work?
Social/Activities – What social activities, organizations, etc. are available for seniors to help deal with isolation, become more involved and offer value to the community?
Healthcare – What health care assistance/accessibility plans making it easier for aging in place strategies?
However, if you stop to think about it, these are the same worries every American has no matter the age. It’s the reason so many came out and voted this year. They’re worried sick about keeping a job, paying bills, affording health care, staying healthy, etc. But for older adults, the worries hit home harder. But as the aging population doubles over the next decades, the problems will multiply.
I think we need to take a stand and let our voices be heard — especially about the worrisome issues we face because one day each one of us will be old and probably worried about finding a ride to the doctor’s office.
If you’re game, I’d like to hear from you. What does your #AgingVoices declare? What are the greatest concerns you face? Here’s mine: “I worry that I’ll get old and stuck having little support and access to social connections in the suburbs.” Yes, it’s called isolation and the biggest reason for depression and chronic illnesses.
If this is important to you, please follow #AgingVoices, @Seniorcarequest @Carebuzz, and like us on Facebook. Check out and subscribe to our YouTube channel — the place to watch interviews. Remember, it’s all about making America a better place to age for all, especially the older family members we love and cherish. #AgingVoices building awareness on local senior issues

#AgingVoices building awareness on local senior issues

#AgingVoices building awareness on local senior issues #AgingVoices building awareness on local senior issues #AgingVoices building awareness on local senior issues #AgingVoices building awareness on local senior issues #AgingVoices building awareness on local senior issues

About the Author

Carol Marak

Carol Marak, aging alone advocate, columnist, speaker and editor at Seniorcare.com. A former family caregiver, who earned a Fundamentals of Gerontology Certificate from the USC Davis School of Gerontology and writes about personal concerns while growing older.

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