How is Sign Language Helping People with Dementia?

How is Sign Language Helping People with Dementia?

The research speaks for itself -- learning new skills and keeping the brain active are among the tools with the best chance of slowing the progression of Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia. Ongoing social connectivity and cognitive exercises are some of the pillars of Nexus at Silverado, a specially designed program that uses clinical findings to help slow the progression of dementia. One of the newest and most recent programs to be put into action is the American Sign Language program at the Silverado Aspen Park memory care community. How is Sign Language Helping People with Dementia? The inspiration for the program came

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How to Make Holidays Special for Someone with Dementia

How to Make Holidays Special for Someone with Dementia

At Silverado, we have nearly 20 years of dedicated experience in caring for individuals with memory impairments, and in that time we’ve developed numerous best practices that have been adopted industry-wide.  How to Make Holidays Special for Someone with Dementia This time of year, we like to share tips for making the holidays enjoyable for a loved with dementia. This advice centers on keeping things simple and enjoying individual moments: How to Make Holidays Special for Someone with Dementia Avoid chaos. Rather than walking someone who has dementia into a room with 10 relatives, encourage relatives to engage in one-on-one conversation,

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10 Dementia Warning Signs to Look for During Holidays

Spending time with loved ones during the holidays means it’s easier to spot all of the small changes in behavior that could mean the early stages of memory impairment. While this can cause initial feelings of worry and panic, taking the time to understand the situation is the first step in providing your mother, father, grandparent, sibling or other family member the best care possible. These are the most common signs that dementia-related changes may be taking place in the brain: Memory lapses that disrupt daily life. Forgetting newly-learned information and important dates or events. Problem-solving and planning difficulties. Difficulty concentrating and

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10 Signs of Caregiver Stress

When you’re caring for someone else, and running your own household, your needs tend to fall to the bottom of the list. While this is a perfectly normal response, it isn’t the healthiest response. You can’t pour from an empty cup, so taking care of your needs is not selfish, it is critical. 10 Signs of Caregiver Stress Easier said than done, I know. I am the worst at following this advice. I have been known to push myself to the point of illness to take care of everyone else’s needs. In fact, I was reviewing resumes for drivers while in

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3 Art Therapy Activities for Those with Alzheimer’s

3 Art Therapy Activities for Those with Alzheimer’s

When you have a loved one with Alzheimer’s, it can be hard to find activities that bring meaning and joy to their life. Speech plays a crucial role in countless activities. As your loved one loses the ability to process language, these activities become harder and harder for them to enjoy. Because of this, the best activities for those living with Alzheimer’s are often activities that engage the non-verbal centers of the brain. 3 Art Therapy Activities for Those with Alzheimer’s Art therapy has recently emerged as an effective therapeutic tool for those suffering from Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

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Busy Fingers, Busy Brain: Why Crafting Is Crucial For Seniors

The US Census Bureau has found that Americans currently spend around five to six hours per day on leisure and sports activities, including hobbies such as crafting.  It’s certainly time well spent, particularly for older adults. Learning and practicing a new craft as a senior brings many rewards; not only can the creative process boost mental health and self-esteem, it can also improve fine motor skills and provide an opportunity for socializing and making friends, which has been scientifically proven to benefit those with Alzheimer's.  So what are you waiting for?  With a broad range of activities to choose from, there’s bound to

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How is Sign Language Helping People with Dementia?

How is Sign Language Helping People with Dementia?

The research speaks for itself -- learning new skills and keeping the brain active are among the tools with the best chance of slowing the progression of Alzheimer’s and other types of dementia. Ongoing social connectivity and cognitive exercises are some of the pillars of Nexus at Silverado, a specially designed program that uses clinical findings to help slow the progression of dementia. One of the newest and most recent programs to be put into action is the American Sign Language program at the Silverado Aspen Park memory care community. How is Sign Language Helping People with Dementia? The inspiration for the program came

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GPS SmartSole® Is a Game Changer for Caregiving

GPS SmartSole® is a discreet trackable smartphone hidden in a shoe insole.  GPS SmartSole®is enormously helpful if you are worried your loved one may wonder or get lost.  This patented product is a game changer for caregivers of people with dementia, Alzheimer’s, autism or other developmental disabilities. 60% of them will become “lost” at least once. 70% of those will become “lost” 3 or more times. 46% of wanders not found within 24 hours may die.  GPS SmartSole® is water resistant and sealed in a trim-able shoe insole. It uses GPS and cellular technology, is charged about every day, and

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7 Types of Brain Injuries You Should Know

7 Types of Brain Injuries You Should Know

As medical science progresses our understanding of the human brain has increased dramatically, which is also expanding our grasp on the ever-important field of brain injuries. 7 Types of Brain Injuries You Should Know A brain injury is any alteration of the brain’s normal function caused by an external force. According to the Centers for Disease and Control Injury Prevention, the most common cause of brain injuries (at 40%) is falls. Over 30 years of research has also linked traumatic brain injury to greater risks of developing Alzheimer’s disease. The effects on the brain vary and can affect physical, cognitive, speech

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