Live in Companions for Seniors

Live in Companions for seniors

Live in Companions for Seniors Live In Caregivers at Home Many aging seniors are not willing to leave home for an assisted living placement. Often, a health crisis must occur before they agree to placement.  We cannot blame them; home is their security and freedom.  Home is a familiar place where they feel comfort and joy.  Naturally, when we give them choices, whether to live in an assisted home community or stay at their home by themselves, they choose the latter. Live-in Companionship However, when children have their own lives to live, leaving aging seniors by themselves creates worry and stress. 

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Make ‘Aging in Place’ a Priority

Make ‘Aging in Place’ a Priority in Georgia According to an AARP study, nearly 90 percent of seniors want to stay in their own homes as they age. This is often referred to as “aging in place.” But, it’s increasingly difficult for Americans to grow old in their own homes due to the cost of aging and the lack of financial resources. Make ‘Aging in Place’ a Priority According to the Administration on Aging, in 2013, more than 4 million people over the age of 65 lived below the poverty level. And, another 2.5 million older adults were classified as “near-poor.”

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Robotics to Help Age in Place

Robotics to Help Age in Place UC-San Diego researchers are working to develop robots that can listen, speak and react to human needs. Robotics to Help Age in Place Earlier this month, the university launched its Contextual Robotics Institute, a multi-disciplinary effort to develop robotic technology with artificial intelligence that can be used to help the country's growing elderly population "age in place." Rajesh Gupta -- professor and chair of the computer science and engineering department at UC-San Diego -- said the new institute's work is unique in that it draws heavily on cognitive sciences with the goal of developing robots that

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Can U.S. meet housing demand of aging population?

Can U.S. meet housing demand of aging population?

Growing older comes with a unique set of challenges: increasing health problems, a dwindling bank account, learning to live on a fixed income, loss of independence, decreased social interaction and, for some, an unfamiliar state of vulnerability. One of the most pressing issues facing seniors, however, is that most basic of needs — a safe and affordable place to live. Can U.S. meet housing demand of aging population? According to a report by the Joint Center for Housing Studies (JCHS) of Harvard University, by 2030, the number of U.S. baby boomers aged 65-74 will reach 38.6 million, and the number

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